turtle mark atkinson

Lady Elliot Island is a coral cay located at the southern tip of Australia's World Heritage Listed Great Barrier Reef. Situated within a highly protected ’Green Zone’ the island is a sanctuary for over 1,200 species of marine life and is known for its abundance of manta rays, turtles, amazing array of spectacular marine life and unspoilt coral reef.

manta

Lady Elliot Island is a coral cay located at the southern tip of the World Heritage Listed Great Barrier Reef. Situated within a highly protected ’Green Zone’ the island is a sanctuary for over 1,200 species of marine life and is known for its abundance of manta rays, turtles, amazing array of spectacular marine life and unspoilt coral reef.

boat

Lady Elliot Island is a coral cay located at the southern tip of the World Heritage Listed Great Barrier Reef. Situated within a highly protected ’Green Zone’ the island is a sanctuary for over 1,200 species of marine life and is known for its abundance of manta rays, turtles, amazing array of spectacular marine life and unspoilt coral reef.

dining

Lady Elliot Island is a coral cay located at the southern tip of the World Heritage Listed Great Barrier Reef. Situated within a highly protected ’Green Zone’ the island is a sanctuary for over 1,200 species of marine life and is known for its abundance of manta rays, turtles, amazing array of spectacular marine life and unspoilt coral reef.

Climate Action Leader

Lady Elliot Island Eco Resort has achieved Climate Action Leader certification. This demonstrates the we are undertaking an advanced level of adaptation, emissions reduction and offsetting. We are ensuring to measure our carbon footprint and continually working on new innovative sustainable practices to further our journey towards our goal of 100% renewable energy by 2020.

GOLD FOR ECOTOURISM

Lady Elliot Island Eco Resort has won gold in the ‘Steve Irwin Award for Ecotourism’ at the annual Queensland Tourism Awards held on Friday 10th November at the Brisbane Convention & Exhibition Centre. The ‘Steve Irwin Award for Ecotourism’ recognises ecologically sustainable tourism with a primary focus on experiencing natural areas that foster environmental and cultural understanding, appreciation and conservation.

Manta Project Update

We are finally back from our trip to Lady Elliot Island where we had an amazing time with the mantas.

Within the first week of the trip, we manage to deploy acoustic tags on 12 individuals, clean up and put back the 5 listening stations around the island and identify all mantas encountered and photographed.

We've also started the Project Manta documentary with Kauffman Production; we manage to get some great footage of tagging and cleaning behaviour and, not surprisingly, are looking forward to the next trip. Good science and heaps of fun.

Project Manta update

The photo-identification of manta rays is going great thanks to all the photos we've received, we have about 210 mantas identified (and still counting) from Heron Island, Lady Elliot Island, Wolf Rock, North Stradbroke Island, Byron Bay and Solitary Islands Marine Park. So far, 49 rays were resighted twice at the same site, including 17 sighted 3 times, and 5 rays 4 times. We now have 7 mantas positively identified and photographed at both Lady Elliot and North Stradbroke Island.

A Bumper Season for Turtles - PART 1

The turtle season was truly a busy one this year, with in excess of 200 nests recorded on the shores of Lady Elliot Island! Lady Elliot this year had over two-hundred green sea turtle nests recorded and many loggerhead turtles. The previous year was a very small one in comparison to this year with around 20 nests recorded; the reason for this put down to the fact that sea turtles will not nest within consecutive years, rather on a 2 to 8 year cycle.

Project Manta update

Project Manta is a research group headed by Dr Kathy Townsend, Dr Mike Bennett, Dr Scarla Weeks and Dr Anthony Richardson from The University of Queensland and PhD candidates Fabrice Jaine and Lydie Coutourier. Fabrice is creating a model for climate change using the manta rays as a bioindicator species and Lydie's PhD project focuses on the population ecology and biology of manta rays in eastern Australia.

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